(Source: daenelicious)

Breaking Down Jaime and Cersei’s Controversial Sex Scene With Last Night’s Game of Thrones Director

  • Vulture: Have you read the books?
  • Alex Graves: I have read a lot of the books, but I didn’t read that scene because I wasn’t doing that scene; I was doing the scene our writers wrote
  • Vulture: People who have read the books are questioning why the scene was changed. As described in the book, told from Jaime’s point of view, Cersei initially resists but quickly gives her consent.
  • Alex Graves: I see, I see. What was talked about was that it was not consensual as it began, but Jaime and Cersei, their entire sexual relationship has been based on and interwoven with risk. And Jaime is very much ready to have sex with her because he hasn’t made love to her since he got back, and she’s sort of cajoled into it, and it is consensual. Ultimately, it was meant to be consensual. [The writers] tried to complicate it a little more with her rejecting his new hand and the state of things.
  • Vulture: You say it “becomes consensual by the end.” I rewatched the scene this morning, and it ends with Cersei saying, “It’s not right, it’s not right,” and Jaime on top of her saying, “I don’t care. I don’t care.” Were you involved with cutting the scene? Was there a longer version of the scene that might have read more like they were both consenting?
  • Alex Graves: It’s my cut of the scene. The consensual part of it was that she wraps her legs around him, and she’s holding on to the table, clearly not to escape but to get some grounding in what’s going on. And also, the other thing that I think is clear before they hit the ground is she starts to make out with him. The big things to us that were so important, and that hopefully were not missed, is that before he rips her undergarment, she’s way into kissing him back. She’s kissing him aplenty.
  • Vulture: How does this interaction change Cersei? She’d been raped by Robert. How does Jaime’s aggression in this moment affect her?
  • Alex Graves: She needs Jaime to deal with Tyrion. That’s really what that scene is about. It’s her saying, “I want you to kill him,” and Jaime saying, “I don’t see why I would kill him.” That’s probably the main reason she consents, is to pull him in, because she’s results-oriented, period. The only man she really feels any respect and admiration for, and authority for, is her father. Beyond that, she loves her children. I think — and I say this personally — she’s largely using Jaime and he hasn’t figured it out yet.
  • Vulture: Same question for Jaime. Was this a new, different side of him emerging?
  • Alex Graves: [...] Jaime, we’ve come to find out, wanted to be and would like to be a good knight but was raised in a family where he was not allowed to be that. In fact, quite the opposite. That’s made him extremely smart and dangerous but not fulfilled.

Tell us your best fan encounter.

(Source: bellamasens)

zuzzolek:

Make me choose:

rikkisixx asked: Ned or Catelyn

"I think the “butterfly effect” that I have spoken of so often was at work here. In the novels, Jaime is not present at Joffrey’s death, and indeed, Cersei has been fearful that he is dead himself, that she has lost both the son and the father/ lover/ brother. And then suddenly Jaime is there before her. Maimed and changed, but Jaime nonetheless. Though the time and place is wildly inappropriate and Cersei is fearful of discovery, she is as hungry for him as he is for her.
The whole dynamic is different in the show, where Jaime has been back for weeks at the least, maybe longer, and he and Cersei have been in each other’s company on numerous occasions, often quarreling. The setting is the same, but neither character is in the same place as in the books, which may be why Dan & David played the sept out differently. But that’s just my surmise; we never discussed this scene, to the best of my recollection.
Also, I was writing the scene from Jaime’s POV, so the reader is inside his head, hearing his thoughts. On the TV show, the camera is necessarily external. You don’t know what anyone is thinking or feeling, just what they are saying and doing.
If the show had retained some of Cersei’s dialogue from the books, it might have left a somewhat different impression — but that dialogue was very much shaped by the circumstances of the books, delivered by a woman who is seeing her lover again for the first time after a long while apart during which she feared he was dead. I am not sure it would have worked with the new timeline.
That’s really all I can say on this issue. The scene was always intended to be disturbing… but I do regret if it has disturbed people for the wrong reasons."

George R.R. Martin responds to fan’s concern over Jaime and Cersei’s scene in “Breaker of Chains” x (via cotilardmarion)

i am daenerys stormborn. your masters may have told you lies about me, or they may have told you nothing. it does not matter. i have nothing to say to them. i speak only to you. first, i went to astapor. those who were slaves in astapor, now stand behind me, f r e e. next i went to yunkai. those who were slaves in yunkai, now stand behind me, f r e e. now i have come to meereen. i am not your enemy. your enemy is beside you. your enemy steals and murders your children. your enemy has nothing for you but chains and suffering, and commands. i do not bring you commands.

                 i  b r i n g   y o u   a   c h o i c e.

(Source: lastisle)

Horses are faster than men. Horses are dumber than men.

"We just went over this boy. Justice can wait."

(Source: jaimelannister)

Rose is my very best friend ever" — Emilia Clarke

(Source: nymheria)